Avoiding Plagiarism - Quoting

When the words of an expert, authority, or relevant individual are particularly clear or expressive, you may want to quote them.

Do not quote all the time: save quotes for instances where the wording is especially powerful.


When should I quote?

  • When language is particularly vivid or expressive.

  • When exact wording is needed for technical accuracy.

  • When the words of an important authority lend weight to an argument.


How do I show I am quoting?

  • Name the source in an introductory phrase.

  • Use quotation marks or indent long quotations.

  • Cite the source appropriately.

If you fail to do this, it is plagiarism.

Original Accurate quoting Plagiarism

Because of their unique perspective, Americans fear globalization less than anyone else, and as a consequence they think about it less than anyone else. When Americans do think about globalization, they think of the global economy as an enlarged version of the American economy.

(Source: Thurow, L. (1993). Fortune Favors the Bold (p. 6). New York: Harper Collins.)

Economist Lester Thurow (1993) has asserted that the American reaction to globalization is different from that of the rest of the world in that "American's fear globalization less than anyone else, and as a consequence . . . think about it less than anyone else" (p. 6).

Why is this accurate?

  • The writer has introduced the quotation with his/her own words.

  • S/he has also named the source in an introduction phrase.

  • S/he has indicated where exact words of the source begin and end by using quotation marks.

     

(Complete Thurow reference appears in bibliography)

The American view of globalization is unlike that of the rest of the world. Because of their unique perspective, Americans fear globalization less than anyone else, and therefore think about it less than anyone else (Thurow, 1993).

Why is this plagiarism?

  • The writer has identified the source but has not put quotation marks around the words.

  • Lack of quotation marks allows the reader to think the words are the writer's, not Thurow's.